Tallulah leads to masking the pandemic

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And here we go again, or maybe we never got off this merry-go-round called Covid-19. As I trot around Downtown Jasper, I see it in all of our business owners. They are just tired of it all. Even within this pandemic, we have another pandemic called Weary of Covid-19. This diagnosis is compliments of Dr. Tallulah Bankhead Putman, Dahling.
Because of this pandemic within the pandemic, I want to talk about something very simple that we can do, masking. Wearing a mask, especially in the Alabama summer, is no one’s favorite thing to do. It’s hot, it’s worrisome, and it’s just no fun. I can tell you that Mike gets really lazy about wearing a mask. However, he is wearing one right now as I dictate this column, and while writing we just received word that the Safer at Home policy has been extended to July 31, 2020. Bear with me because I’m going to repeat some things that you’ve heard but perhaps may or may not be implementing.

This information is provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

•CDC recommends that people wear cloth face coverings in public settings when around people outside of their household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.

•Cloth face coverings may help prevent people who have COVID-19 from spreading the virus to others.

•Cloth face coverings are most likely to reduce the spread of COVID-19 when they are widely used by people in public settings.

•Cloth face coverings should NOT be worn by children under the age of 2 or anyone who has trouble breathing, is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
Wearing a mask protects us all. We all recognize that valid reasons exist where people should not or cannot wear masks.

•Individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing—or those who care for or interact with a person who is hearing impaired—may be unable to wear cloth face coverings if they rely on lip reading to communicate.
In this situation, consider using a clear face covering.

•Individuals should not wear cloth face coverings engaged in activities that may cause the cloth face covering to become wet, like when swimming at the beach or pool. A wet cloth face covering will make it difficult to breathe.

•Individuals who are engaged in high intensity activities, like running, may not be able to wear a cloth face covering if it causes difficulty breathing. If unable to wear a cloth face covering, consider conducting the activity in a location with greater ventilation and air exchange (for instance, outdoors versus indoors) and where it is possible to maintain physical distance from others.

More instances exist where wearing a mask isn’t safe or practical. But let’s face it (no pun intended); the vast majority of you humans can generally all mask-up.
As I priss through Downtown Jasper, I do want to remind some of you how to wear and how not to wear a mask. I know I’m just a canine, but if you’re wearing a mask around your neck, I predict that it will be ineffective in arresting the spread of Covid-19. I also don’t suggest wearing it on the top of your head; also ineffective. It’s simple: wear your mask so that it covers your mouth and nose.
As we work not to just reopen Main Street, but also our entire business community, let’s do the right thing and mask up!

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