Downed trees, roof damage reported in small community
by Jennifer Cohron & Elane Jones
Apr 30, 2014 | 3066 views | 0 0 comments | 38 38 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A 2x4 board was driven through the top of the cab on this tractor-trailer owned by Gilmore Reclamation. The board and other pieces of metal roofing that can be seen covering the truck came from a building owned by Jerry Gilmore that was destroyed when high winds ripped through the Boldo community Monday night. Daily Mountain Eagle photos - Elane Jones
A 2x4 board was driven through the top of the cab on this tractor-trailer owned by Gilmore Reclamation. The board and other pieces of metal roofing that can be seen covering the truck came from a building owned by Jerry Gilmore that was destroyed when high winds ripped through the Boldo community Monday night. Daily Mountain Eagle photos - Elane Jones
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The Boldo community bore the brunt of the storms that passed over Walker County Monday night.

Walker County Emergency Management Coordinator Regina Myers said several structures sustained roof damage and a number of trees in the area were downed.

South Pine Drive, Sunlight Road and Old Parrish Road were among the roadways that were temporarily blocked by trees during the night.

Jerry Gilmore, owner of Gilmore Reclamation, said the high winds associated with storms that rolled through the county Monday night destroyed one building and caused major damage to three others that he owns on Alabama Highway 69 North in Boldo.

“It’s a mess. The wind completely demolished one of the buildings, sending metal and wood flying into several of our tractor-trailer trucks,” Gilmore said. “One of the trucks even has a 2x4 sticking through the roof on the cab of the truck.”

Dewayne West, pastor of New Vision Ministries, said the church sustained roof and siding damage, as well as a fallen power pole that landed on a nearby vehicle.

“We’re just thankful it isn’t any worse than it is and no one was injured,” West said. “We can replace a building, but you can’t replace people’s lives.”

West said church members were up until around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday putting a tarp on the roof of the church.

A structure fire that occurred in Oakman Monday night is also suspected to be storm-related.

“It could have been worse. To my knowledge, we had no injuries reported from any of the trees that fell,” Myers said.

The division headquarters of Alabama EMA that was recently relocated to Bevill State Community College was activated at 7 a.m. Tuesday.

Regional coordinator Tony Wingo said Tuesday afternoon that the damage in Walker County was typical of what occurred in the other counties within Region 5/Division E. The division consists of Walker, Fayette, Lamar, Winston, Marion, Lawrence, Franklin, Colbert and Lauderdale counties.

The storm system that hit Boldo came through Fayette County but appeared to weaken as it approached the county line.

The EMA said the National Weather Service would be conducting a survey to determine if the damage was caused by high straight-line winds or a small tornado.

The National Weather Service upgraded the severe thunderstorm warning that had been issued for Walker County to a tornado warning as the storm was approaching Jasper from Oakman.

The first warning of the night passed near Carbon Hill. Myers said the EMA office has not received any reports of damage from that area of the county.

A second round of storms made their way through the area Tuesday night.

Walker County is also part of a flash flood watch that will remain in effect through 7 a.m. today.

“The rivers are in good shape right now, so they shouldn’t be an issue. Flash flooding is the main concern because the ground is already so saturated,” Myers said.