Two new assistant district attorneys sworn in to office
by Rachel Davis
Oct 12, 2013 | 1881 views | 0 0 comments | 34 34 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Eric Hamilton was sworn in Friday morning as one of two new assistant district attorneys for Walker County. Hamilton is the first African American to serve in that capacity in the county. Photo Special to the Eagle
Eric Hamilton was sworn in Friday morning as one of two new assistant district attorneys for Walker County. Hamilton is the first African American to serve in that capacity in the county. Photo Special to the Eagle
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Two new assistant district attorneys were sworn in by Presiding Circuit Judge Jerry Selman on Friday morning. Those ADAs, Alana Sewell and Eric Hamilton, took their oath in front of a packed courtroom, as well as family and friends.

Walker County District Attorney Bill Adair said they were both people of high character with a good work ethic who exemplified the Christian ideals he expects his office to uphold.

The ceremony was of special importance because Hamilton is the county’s first African-American assistant district attorney.

“The historical significance of this can’t be ignored,” Adair said. “You can tell by the number of people here how significant it is to the community.”

Hamilton is a fourth-generation pastor who spent seven years working as a Birmingham police officer and two years as a parole officer before attending the Birmingham School of Law and passing the bar.

His wife, Erica, and their three children attended the ceremony Friday. He is currently the pastor at Woodward Chapel AME Church in Bessemer and lives in Birmingham.

“I hope to be able to serve the citizens of Walker County and help reduce crime as much as possible,” Hamilton said.

Sewell has been working with the DA’s office for a year and specializes in cases where women and children have been victimized.

Adair said she has been instrumental in getting the Walker County Children’s Advocacy Center off the ground.

“I’ve really enjoyed it, I love the people and the work I do,” Sewell said.

Although her cases are often difficult, emotional and detailed, Sewell said that it is satisfying to be able to protect those victims.

Her mother, Doris Sewell, attended the ceremony and said she was proud of her daughter.

“She loves her work and serving her community,” she said. “This is a passion for her to defend women and children.”