Downtown demolition bid process begins
by Jennifer Cohron
Feb 14, 2013 | 2219 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bids are now being accepted to demolish 24 buildings in downtown Cordova destroyed by the April 27, 2011, tornadoes. Bids will be taken until noon on Tuesday, March 12. Daily Mountain Eagle - Ron Harris
Bids are now being accepted to demolish 24 buildings in downtown Cordova destroyed by the April 27, 2011, tornadoes. Bids will be taken until noon on Tuesday, March 12. Daily Mountain Eagle - Ron Harris
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CORDOVA — The city of Cordova is now accepting bids to tear down its devastated downtown district.

A total of 24 buildings, most of which are privately-owned, are slated to be demolished.

In addition to Main Street, the project will include two buildings on Commerce Street, a two-story house on Green Avenue and the old Piggly Wiggly.

Eight city buildings will be part of demolition, although officials recently learned that federal funds cannot be used to raze these public structures.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency confirmed in January that the city had been approved for $840,000 of the nearly $1 million it had sought for more than 18 months to help offset the cost of demolition.

However, disaster recovery coordinator Dean Harbison said Tuesday night that city officials were later informed of a “hiccup” regarding paperwork that led to only the 16 private structures receiving approval for demolition funding.

“We went to bat and tried to take care of it. In order to do that, we’re looking at about another two year review, and we’re not waiting,” Harbison told the Cordova City Council.

The city will be responsible for five percent of the cost of demolition of the private buildings as well as the total cost of tearing down the public structures.

The bid package for the demolition project became available on Tuesday at City Hall.

Contractors must return their proposals to City Hall by noon on Tuesday, March 12.

The request for proposals will be advertised in major publications throughout the state.

“This is going to require a large firm...I’d like to attract as many bids as possible. Competition is going to be the key to keeping the price down,” Mayor Drew Gilbert said in the council meeting.

Harbison said once the contract is awarded and demolition begins, the contractor will have 60 days to complete the project. A penalty of $1,000 per day will be administered for every day that work continues past that timeframe.

Gilbert told the council that this summer is shaping up to an exciting one for Cordova residents.

“You’re talking about demo completing and the grocery store beginning to come up all at the same time, and that’s really going to be a great time for the city,” Gilbert said.