Taylor keeps family tradition of law enforcement alive

By JENNIFER COHRON
Posted 5/9/19

Editor's note: This is the first in a three-part series on three new sergeants at the Walker County Sheriff's Office.What started as a joke 17 years ago became a career for Shane Taylor, one of three …

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Taylor keeps family tradition of law enforcement alive

Posted

Editor's note: This is the first in a three-part series on three new sergeants at the Walker County Sheriff's Office.


What started as a joke 17 years ago became a career for Shane Taylor, one of three employees at the Walker County Sheriff's Office who was recently promoted to sergeant.

Taylor and a cousin were job hunting at the same time and one of them half-jokingly suggested becoming cops. Taylor's uncle, Joe Taylor, was then over 30 years into what would turn out to be a 40-year career at the sheriff's department.

Taylor and his cousin found work in Walker County Jail. The cousin eventually moved on, but Taylor settled in as a patrol deputy after his one-year stint in the jail ended. 

"I've enjoyed it. I enjoy helping people. Of course, there are some you can't help, but I love doing the work," said Taylor, who has been promoted to daytime patrol sergeant.

His calls on an average day can range from working traffic and conducting welfare checks on individuals who haven't responded to contact from family members to settling a dispute between neighbors over a barking dog.

Rarely does he have the kind of day that reality TV viewers expect of law enforcement, but every day he has the opportunity to impact a life.

Once while working the midnight shift, Taylor helped bring a mother of two safely home after she had been missing for several hours.

More recently, he passed along some drug treatment resources to a young man he had encountered several times.

"I went in the jail one day and he came up and shook my hand. He said, 'If it wasn't for you, I'd be dead right now.' That makes you feel better about how you spent your day," Taylor said.