Sumiton Utility adds new device to treat sewage

By RICK WATSON
Posted 7/11/19

SUMITON – Mayor Petey Ellis has announced that the city had ordered a new hyperchlorinator for the city’s sewage lagoon.He made the announcement at the Sumiton City Council meeting on July 2. …

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Sumiton Utility adds new device to treat sewage

Posted

SUMITON – Mayor Petey Ellis has announced that the city had ordered a new hyperchlorinator for the city’s sewage lagoon.

He made the announcement at the Sumiton City Council meeting on July 2.

Once put into service, this device will further treat the wastewater, and it’s expected to reduce the odors from the sewage system both in the vicinity of the lagoon on Main Street and at the Mulberry Forks, where wastewater is discharged into the Sipsey Fork of the Black Warrior River.

The city became aware of the odor issue at the discharge point near Sipsey last August when citizens in the Empire and Sipsey area complained on social media about odors near the Mulberry Forks.

When the city realized there was an issue, they called a meeting to work on a solution for the problem, according to Ellis. “Everybody put their heads together and this (the hyperchlorinator) is what we decided to do,” Ellis said. 

The city ordered the hyperchlorinator, as well as a building and they arrived in early July. The city’s utility workers were onsite Tuesday setting the building in place at the treatment facility, according to Tim Diveto, who is the head of the Sumiton Utilities Department.

The wastewater in the lagoon was already being treated, but the city added hyperchlorination to help with the odor in the city and at the discharge point, according to Diveto. The goal is to put the new device into operation by July 19, according to Diveto.

After city workers set everything in place, the manufacturer will come onsite to install the device and set the limits, according to Diveto. They may not have to use the hyperchlorinator but two months out of the year, but they want to have that precautionary measure in place in case it’s needed, according to Diveto.

“We don’t take these problems lightly and we spent more than $50,000 trying to help ease the situation,” Ellis said. “Our numbers up there are where then need to be but this is an extra step to curtail whatever else is going on up there.”