Rain dampens drought in Walker County

By ED HOWELL
Posted 7/19/19

The rains this week associated with Hurricane Barry seemed to have done the trick in stopping the new drought in Walker County in its tracks. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor's weekly …

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Rain dampens drought in Walker County

Posted

The rains this week associated with Hurricane Barry seemed to have done the trick in stopping the new drought in Walker County in its tracks. 

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor's weekly report on Thursday, all of Walker County was listed as being abnormally dry. That is an improvement over last week, when a large part of the south half of the county was listed in moderate drought. 

The information on Thursday reflected conditions that existed as late as Tuesday. 

Areas of drought last week over Fayette County, northern Tuscaloosa County and extreme west Jefferson County also pulled back to abnormal dry conditions. Drought was still found in Central Alabama that included sections of Tuscaloosa and Jefferson counties, among  others. 

As of now, all of Winston County, most of Fayette County and the northeastern third of Marion County were listed abnormally dry, as was the western half of Cullman County and northern Blount County. The north half of Jefferson County and much of southern and western Marion County had no dry conditions whatsoever. 

Moderate and severe drought conditions were found this week in a large section of southeast Alabama. 

According to the latest numbers, 558,016 people in the state are in drought conditions of some kind. Those in severe drought rose from 2.88 percent to 3.68 percent, and those at least in moderate drought or worse rose up a fraction. However, those in at least abnormally dry conditions or worse decreased from 45.44 percent to 39.5 percent.

The amount of the state with no drought at all increased from 54.56 percent to 60.5 percent, which is closer to what the percentages were about three months ago. 

A written weekly report from the U.S. Drought Monitor's website noted, "Showers associated with the remnants of Hurricane Berry were heaviest across western Alabama. In southwestern Alabama, however, Dothan's rainfall from June 1-July 16 totalled 4.83 inches (55 percent of normal)." On July 14, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that topsoil moisture was 30 percent very short to short in Alabama. 

More rains were forecast to come to Walker County from now through the weekend, with the National Weather Service forecasting a 40 percent to 60 percent chance of precipitation every day through Tuesday.