Prothro finds new home with Vikings

By W. BRIAN HALE Eagle Sports Writer
Posted 6/30/18

Before Nick Saban built Alabama into the powerhouse dynasty the program is currently known as today, Tyrone Prothro thrilled Crimson Tide fans with his extraordinary skills as a wide receiver and …

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Prothro finds new home with Vikings

Posted

Before Nick Saban built Alabama into the powerhouse dynasty the program is currently known as today, Tyrone Prothro thrilled Crimson Tide fans with his extraordinary skills as a wide receiver and special teams player in an era filled with highs and low.

Prothro will look to pass on his knowledge both on and off the field as the new wide receivers coach of the Jasper Vikings, a post he was named to last week.

After spending a year at Spanish Fort where he was also the wide receivers coach, Jasper Athletic Director Jonathan Jordan, who was a manager during Prothro’s career at ‘Bama, offered him a spot on the Vikings’ staff.

“Jonathan knew I had been living away from my family for a while and this was an opportunity for me to be much closer to them,” Prothro said. “He approached me with the offer and I took it as a way to get my family back together.”

Prothro met some of his fellow coaches and new players during the Vikings’ Youth Football camp on Saturday and was pleased with the welcoming response he received.

“Everyone was excited to meet me and eager to get to work,” he said. “They all had a very positive outlook  on what we could do this year.”

Prothro became immortalized in college football and Crimson Tide history with two plays during the 2005 season that have been replayed countless times. Against Southern Miss, he made a touchdown catch on the back of an Eagles’ defensive back in what would become known as “The Catch” — which won him an ESPY award for Best Play and the Pontiac Game Changing Award of the Year.

A few games later in a 31-3 victory over the Florida Gators, another one of his plays became legendary — for the gruesome injury he suffered.  Coming down with a potential catch late in the game, Prothro landed awkwardly and broke two bones in his leg, ending his stellar career prematurely.

His abilities on the field, as well as the lessons he’s learned in dealing with adversity, are what Prothro is eager to pass on to the young men under his direction.

“One of my main goals is to not only teach kids about the game of football, but to teach them about the game of life as well,” Prothro said. “I want to use my experiences to influence and mentor our young men. Football is going to end for everyone, regardless if that’s at the end of your senior year, in college or in the pros. You need a back-up plan on what you want to do after football in case something like my situation happens.”