Lutis Moore named AHSAA's top wrestling official

By W. BRIAN HALE, Eagle Sports Writer
Posted 5/22/20

Four years ago, Lutis Moore left coaching wrestling at Maddox Middle and Jasper High schools to become an administrator — while also switching roles on the mat to one as a referee.

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Lutis Moore named AHSAA's top wrestling official

Posted

Four years ago, Lutis Moore left coaching wrestling at Maddox Middle and Jasper High schools to become an administrator — while also switching roles on the mat to one as a referee.

The transition for the Jasper Junior High School Principal was one that involved a great amount of learning, but his love of the sport and eagerness to stay involved assisted Moore in the move.

His efforts to consistently improve as an official and representative of the sport has gained attention, culminating with Moore being named as the Alabama High School Athletic Association (AHSAA) Official of the Year.

Moore stated his goal when officiating a match is to represent the sport in the best way possible, while making sure the contest is called in the most correct way possible.

“It’s never my intention to be the guy that causes too much turmoil for a match — it’s why I’m as careful as possible when I’m officiating,” Moore said. “Going from being a coach to officiating involves a learning curve — you look at things from two different lenses, and from an official’s lenses, it’s much more different. To win an award like this let’s me know that I’m improving every single year.”

The award for being the state’s official of the year will also serve as motivation for Moore to continue to improve, a process he said never ends.

“I will still continue to go to camps and do what I have to be a better official every year — it’s a process that’s never-ending when you want to ensure the most fair, properly balanced correctly called match,” Moore said.

“Ultimately what’s fun for me is watching the young people compete in wrestling and how they grow. At the beginning of a season you might see a wrestler struggle against a fellow competitor, then in January see the same wrestler comes very close to winning or actually wins the match, while also seeing the great sportsmanship wrestling represents. You see it from a different perspective as an official, but the joy remains the same.”