It's that-a-way: Jasper Main Street installs new downtown signs

By ED HOWELL
Posted 8/9/19

Visitors looking for directions in Jasper will have a little more help now that new directional signs have been installed downtown. Mike Putman, the executive director of Jasper Main Street, and …

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It's that-a-way: Jasper Main Street installs new downtown signs

Posted

Visitors looking for directions in Jasper will have a little more help now that new directional signs have been installed downtown. 

Mike Putman, the executive director of Jasper Main Street, and Jasper city crewmen Johnny Duncan and Jerry Parker spent all of Thursday installing nine signs around Jasper, listing a number of attractions, government offices and areas that are commonly asked for in the city. The signs were installed on decorative light poles downtown. 

Putman said the signs were installed on T.R. Simmons Elementary School, at Airport Road and Highway 118 (78) at the Kangaroo station, the Jasper First United Methodist Church, at Ninth Avenue and 18th Street, on 19th Street at the old Rock ministries, Elliott Boulevard and 19th Street, Third Avenue and Highway 118, across from Security Federal, and Ninth Avenue and Fifth Street, at the Son's parking lot. 

The $6,000 project was undertaken by Jasper Main Street with full funding by the Bankhead Fund, Putman said. The signs were designed by Holly Trawick of the Walker College Foundation and constructed by Quality Graphics in Jasper, with some components holding the signs being designed and built by A&A Machine and Welding's Scott Aaron in Pineywoods.

"This is designed for visitors and new residents to come downtown and find businesses for shopping and dining," as well as for finding attractions and government offices, Putman said. He said some places on the signs, such as Musgrove Country Club, Highway 118 and the Walker County Airport-Bevill Field, are also designed to help people to find their way back out of downtown. 

Among the sites that Putman said are listed on the signs include the courthouse and city hall area, restaurants and retail, breweries, the downtown car charge station, the U.S. Post Office, the Carl Elliott Regional Library, downtown parking, the Bankhead House and the Carl Elliott Museum. ATM machines from Synovus and Pinnacle are also listed on some of the signs, and some historical sites are listed. 

The signs are hung from the poles by chains, with the individual attraction signs flowing vertically and connected to each other by hooks, with the bottom sign hooked and attached firmly to a bottom horizontal pole. Each sign has the Main Street logo, saying "Downtown Jasper" and, in smaller lettering, "The Bankhead Fund." 

Putman said he is braced for some local people to say they already know where those sites are, but that he wants to emphasize that out-of-town visitors who come to downtown, for shopping, business, government relations or events such as the Foothills Festival, will find the signs useful to get around. While going to those events, they may find other businesses or directions that might encourage them to shop or eat so they can spend their money locally. 

Also, he said many people who move to Jasper may not know their way around yet, and the signs can help them get comfortable with the area without having to ask so many questions. 

Putman thanked the Bankhead Fund, the City of Jasper, the other businesses and individuals who helped with the project. He said he was particularly proud of the fact that the project was done with local businesses and individuals helping to produce the signs, as well as to be funded locally.