Disappointed in Scalia editorial

Posted 2/19/16

I was greatly disappointed in the decision of the Eagle to run the editorial from the St. Louis Post Dispatch pertaining to Justice Scalia. You have the right to publish anything you like – but I would hope you would strive to avoid publishing that which is misleading, if not downright untrue. There is much to say on this column, but let us focus on the description of Mr. Scalia:

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Disappointed in Scalia editorial

Posted

I was greatly disappointed in the decision of the Eagle to run the editorial from the St. Louis Post Dispatch pertaining to Justice Scalia. You have the right to publish anything you like – but I would hope you would strive to avoid publishing that which is misleading, if not downright untrue. There is much to say on this column, but let us focus on the description of Mr. Scalia:

“His biting dissents too often devolved into personal attacks on his colleagues. His demeanor was grating but tolerable. Our problem was with his predictable politics.”

That, to put it bluntly, is a crock. Please read the full tribute written to him by arguably his fiercest opponent on the Court – yet his closest friend, Justice Ginsburg. Space prevents me from reprinting it here, but the gist is captured in her closing sentence: “It was my great good fortune to have known him as a working colleague and treasured friend.” The two justices and their families enjoyed one another and even vacationed together. Yes, his dissents were perhaps biting (Ms. Ginsburg praised his dissents, and states that they challenged and strengthened her final opinions.), but they were not personal attacks.

He, more than most, kept his “politics” out of his decisions. He wrote that if a judge always liked the outcome of his judicial decisions, he was probably doing something wrong. Legislating should be left to the legislature. Justice Scalia let the law take him to the appropriate legal conclusion, not personal opinion. This, apparently, is the Dispatch’s problem. The Dispatch would prefer judges who will read their politics into their decisions, so long as their politics agree with that of the Dispatch.

Disappointingly,

Ted Freeman, Jasper

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