Walker County Schools

County students paving their way to college

By NICOLE SMITH
Posted 5/14/19

Students in Walker County Schools are paving their way to college.Two large groups of students were recognized at the Walker County Board of Education meeting last Thursday. Ten of those students are …

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Walker County Schools

County students paving their way to college

Posted

Students in Walker County Schools are paving their way to college.

Two large groups of students were recognized at the Walker County Board of Education meeting last Thursday. Ten of those students are joining an elite master class of fellow peers that have earned 30 or greater on the the ACT that measures academic achievement.

"For those planning to attend college, a top ACT score is the sought after prize," Superintendent Dr. Joel Hagood said Thursday. "It's the goal. The higher your ACT score, the more likely you are to be able to attend your school of choice and the more likely you are to receive scholarships."

The highest a student can earn on the ACT is a 36. 

The following students all earned 30 or higher on the ACT: Anna Gurganus (30) and Shaylan Woods (30) of Cordova High School; Jacob Cater (32), Macy McCauley (31), Kaitlyn Gordon (30) and Daniel Haynes (31) of Curry High School; Micah Harrison (34) and Seth Martin (31) of Dora High School; and Cameron Freeman (32) and Sawyer Gurganus (30) of Oakman High School.

Over 20 students were also awarded dual enrollment scholarships with Bevill State Community College.

Dual enrollment allows high school students to earn high school and college credit with BSCC.

Hagood and Bevill State Dual Enrollment Coordinator Kristy Swindle presented the following students with dual enrollment scholarships Thursday: Santana Clark, Gracie Edwards, Emily Keeton, Leandra Totten, Taylor Ganus and Amara Killen of Carbon Hill High School; McCartney Hagar, Cameron Frost, Mary Tuggle and Yasmine Chatman of Cordova High School; Emily Reed,  Ashley Manasco, Parker Freeman, Kelly Green, Marcus Howard, Kyla Nibblett and Noah Sumner of Dora High School; and Alivia Bridgmon, Iyana Canada, James Dye, Johnathan Lollar, Ella Medders, Bethany Shepherd and Chante Williams of Oakman High School. 

Each scholarship is valued at $414, and just over $9,900 was awarded to all students combined. 

Walker College Foundation (WCF) Executive Director Holly Trawick was at the board meeting Thursday, and she spoke to the advantages of dual enrollment.

"In many cases, being able to take a college level class while you're still in high school gives you the incentive to keep going, and we want our students to keep going," she said.

On behalf of the WCF, Trawick announced recipients of the Foundation's Counselors Choice Dual Enrollment Scholarship, which is awarded to one student per semester at every county high school and Jasper High School each year.  

Students who received the Counselors Choice Dual Enrollment Scholarship for the spring semester are Jontell Tucker of Dora High School, Alayna Ivie of Carbon Hill High School, Mikaela Burton of Oakman High School, Alyssa Rhodes of Cordova High School and Ethan Wideman of Curry High School.  

The scholarship from WCF includes tuition and fees for one dual enrollment course and a book for instruction.

WCF was established in 1994 and provides scholarships to students who are enrolled at Bevill State's Jasper campus. 

"We've been around for 25 years, and in 25 years we've awarded more than $2.5 million in scholarships to students who are in and around Walker County," Trawick said. "That's a lot of students, and we hope it's making a huge difference in how our students are educated."

Swindle spoke of the partnership between the school systems, Bevill State and WCF that has provided a valuable jump start for students who want to earn a college degree. 

"By working together, it has allowed us to offer a class at each high school, which is an incredible opportunity to take a full college class for college credit at the high school at no expense to students," Swindle said.