Civil Service Board gains new members

By ED HOWELL
Posted 8/19/17

Daily Mountain Eagle

The Walker County Civil Service Board has two new appointments and a new chairman, while the board has also agreed to rotate the chairman position once a year.

Eddie Miller of Jasper was appointed by Gov. Kay Ivey on June …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

Civil Service Board gains new members

Posted

Daily Mountain Eagle

The Walker County Civil Service Board has two new appointments and a new chairman, while the board has also agreed to rotate the chairman position once a year.

Eddie Miller of Jasper was appointed by Gov. Kay Ivey on June 26, while Franklin Eugene Sadberry of Parrish was appointed to the board by Ivey on July 26, board coordinator Sharon Tucker said Thursday.

The latest to rotate off was David Kelly of Oakman, who has served as the chairman of the board. He was not reappointed to the board by Ivey, Tucker said. Kelly’s latest term ended this summer.

Linda Ensor, Bruce Bennett and Gary Davis are the three remaining members of the board. At Monday’s board meeting, board meetings agreed they would rotate the chairman’s position among board members every year. The annual rotation will take place on or about Aug. 1.

Davis was appointed as chairman and Ensor was appointed as vice chairman. All of the new changes were approved unanimously.

Davis could not be reached for comment.

According to the board’s website, Davis and Miller are up for reappointment in July 2019, followed by Ensor in 2021, Bennett in 2022 and Sadberry in 2023.

The board had become a hot topic earlier this year when District 4 Walker County Commissioner Steven Aderholt, accompanied by other county officials, tried on April 10 to make a presentation to the board. However, Kelly said Aderholt had not followed procedures for giving advance word of the presentation and Aderholt was prevented from speaking.

Aderholt then said online April 14 he wanted to abolish the Civil Service Board by ending the enabling legislation creating it. A few weeks later, he told the Daily Mountain Eagle he had decided to step back and wait a certain amount of time to see if the board, which he said has new members, will be able to correct problems he sees with the system.

He said at the time he wanted a simplified personnel system for county employees, but still wants to find a way to protect workers from politically-motivated turnovers immediately after new officials are elected. Aderholt was also concerned about how expensive the process had become and how cases dragged out for months and even years.

Officials with the board in recent months have said the process has worked well and strives to be fair.

A 2015 citizens committee looking at the county’s finances included as one of its recommendations that the board be abolished, saying it would provide a minimum or $100,000 in cost savings. “Almost all of Alabama’s counties have eliminated costly civil service boards and replaced them with an internal personnel function.

A 1-cent sales tax failed at the polls on Tuesday, which has placed the county in danger of bankruptcy, as it faces a $1.4 million deficit for Fiscal 2018 due to impending bond payments.