City adapts social media policy

By JENNIFER COHRON, Daily Mountain Eagle
Posted 2/17/17

cordova — Cordova Mayor Drew Gilbert unveiled several changes to the city’s social media policy at Tuesday night’s City Council meeting.

Department heads will now send updates to one person instead of three different people, and they will …

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City adapts social media policy

Posted

cordova — Cordova Mayor Drew Gilbert unveiled several changes to the city’s social media policy at Tuesday night’s City Council meeting.

Department heads will now send updates to one person instead of three different people, and they will be expected to submit at least one update per week.

“There has been no limit or expectation of how much came from what department. We’d get seven from one and nothing from another. It resulted in inconsistent messages across platforms, and we would have a lot of updates on one department and not a lot about the other department,” Gilbert said.

The city adopted its first social media plan in 2014. It currently has two Facebook pages, City of Cordova-Government for general city business and Cordova Public Safety for updates from the police and fire departments.

The city also has a presence on other social media sites such as Twitter.

Gilbert said he hopes the changes will bring balance to the city’s online communication.

Every department will get the same amount of weekly posts under the new plan and the city will have a constant stream of updates to provide to residents.

“I feel like we blast info and then not put info, blast info and not put info. The goal here is to have a more consistent output of information from all departments,” Gilbert said.

In other action, the council:

•approved a 3 percent pay raise for all employees with the exception of department heads. The raises are part of an annual merit increase put in place during Gilbert’s first term. The council also approved a $10 per hour base pay scale for dispatchers and receptionists and $11.50 per hour scale for public works laborers.

The raise will take effect the first pay period in March for employees who have been with the city for at least six months.

Council member Ed Earp also requested that the city investigate whether it is in compliance with labor laws by paying part-time employees the same wage as full-time employees.

•discussed the need for Public Works Superintendent Harley Gilbert to acquire his CDL license.

“You’ve been employed long enough that you should have already had them,” council member Melody Dawkins said.

Gilbert said he had rescheduled the test several times because he had to remain in the city to address sewer problems or other issues that occurred.

“That was a condition of employment. Regardless of what transpires at work, you’ve got other people that can handle things so you can take care of an essential job function that you’ve been tasked to do,” Earp said.

•learned that Gilbert has declared building inspector Gerald Grace to be the appropriate municipal official under the city’s new dangerous buildings ordinance. Public works employee Wayne Brown has been serving in the role but is currently off work due to illness. The appropriate municipal official files paperwork that is necessary for dangerous and dilapidated structures to be addressed under the ordinance.

The city razed its first property under the new ordinance last year. Two more properties are on the list for 2017.

•opened nine bids for surplus property.

•accepted a bid of $1,700 for scrap metal.

•discussed the need for a city-wide cleanup day to address litter.

•recognized Mycah Pilkington and Braden Ford from Cordova Boy Scout Troop 114 for the pledge of allegiance.