Bright future ahead for Oakman senior

By NICOLE SMITH
Posted 5/18/19

Oakman High School senior Cameron Freeman is a dedicated leader who is up for any challenge.When the Daily Mountain Eagle went to interview Freeman, she was busy passing out yearbooks to students in …

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Bright future ahead for Oakman senior

Posted

Oakman High School senior Cameron Freeman is a dedicated leader who is up for any challenge.

When the Daily Mountain Eagle went to interview Freeman, she was busy passing out yearbooks to students in her role as yearbook editor.  

"You get to influence how people remember their high school years, which I think is a really cool thing," Freeman said about the yearbook, with a bright smile. "You can capture the best moments and make sure that they're featured."

Freeman stays busy as president of the school's SGA and Beta Club as well. 

Her leadership skills were enhanced by participating in Youth Leadership Walker County as a junior and Junior Ambassadors as a senior — both Chamber of Commerce of Walker County programs. 

"I really enjoyed both of those programs a lot," she said. "You really get to learn a lot about the community and local government."

She was also part of the American Legion Auxiliary's Girls State program. 

Freeman shines in the classroom as well, and says her favorite subjects are science and history.

She has been dual enrolled with Bevill State Community College and has already earned a semester's worth of college credit. 

The bright student also knows exactly what she wants to do after college. She will be attending the University of Alabama at Birmingham on a full ride scholarship on a pre-med track, and she intends to become a neurologist. 

"I have a lot of family members deal with neurodegenerative diseases, like dementia and alzheimer's. I didn't understand it, because I was really young when it happened," she said.

Over the years, Freeman has conducted her own research to study the brain, which cemented her career decision.

When asked how she juggles it all and is a role model to her peers, she said she simply encourages being open to opportunities that can yield a positive outcome.

"Showing students that it's possible to balance all of these things and have an enjoyable high school experience," Freeman said. "Even though your plate might be full, it doesn't mean that it has to be miserable. You can always find a way to balance it."

She credits her friends, family and teachers for supporting her during many endeavors, and while she admits it's a bit emotional to know graduation is coming soon, she's ready.

In fact, Freeman has her summer planned out. She will be interning with a professor at the University of Alabama to conduct dementia research.

"It's starting to sink in that I'm not going to be here next year," she said. "Even though it's a little sad to be leaving Oakman, I'm excited for the future and getting to move on to the next chapter."