Avid recycler Steve Trash visits Arley

By JENNIFER COHRON
Posted 2/10/19

ARLEY — Environmental educator Steve Trash reminded Meek students that "Mother Nature's rules rule" during an appearance at Meek High School on Monday."Mother Nature recycles everything — the …

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Avid recycler Steve Trash visits Arley

Posted

ARLEY — Environmental educator Steve Trash reminded Meek students that "Mother Nature's rules rule" during an appearance at Meek High School on Monday.

"Mother Nature recycles everything — the water, the land, the air. People ask me why I am an avid recycler. Because if you want to play baseball, you can't play baseball by football's rules. Mother Nature has rules, and those rules involve recycling," Trash said. 

Trash came to Arley to help celebrate a new "Meek Goes Green" initiative that started Jan. 14. Elementary and high school students have been learning about the importance of recycling in a four-week science curriculum developed by Camp McDowell Environmental Center educators.

Bins have also been placed in all classrooms and other convenient locations around the school to encourage recycling.

A large container secured from JCR Recycling of Cullman has been placed on the campus exclusively for school use. However, students have been provided a backpack to bring recyclables from home.

The Arley Women's Club spearheaded a local recycling movement in June. After collecting recyclables twice a month for several months, the group moved on to phase two of the recycling program — education.

The club received $3,000 from the Northwest Alabama Resource Conservation and Development Council and provided match money to implement the new program at Meek elementary and high schools.

Representatives from the Arley Women's Club, Camp McDowell and the Northwest Alabama Resource Conservation and Development Council were on hand for Trash's presentation on Monday.

Trash, who uses a stage name, has taken his magic and comedy show around the world since 1984.

The props used in his act were all repurposed by Trash for a magic trick after having been discarded by someone else.  

Trash wowed the high school crowd by playing two guitars — one made out of a rusted metal gas can and another made out of a cigar box.  

He told students that a discarded velvet Elvis painting helped him understand the importance of recycling as a child.  

"The frame was broken, so someone had thrown it away. I was 7, but I understood intuitively, 'That still has value. It can be fixed,'" Trash said.

Today, Trash is a resident of the small Franklin County town of Frog Pond. He and his wife live in a green home. There is a 21-panel solar array in his front yard that produces more power than their home consumes on a sunny day.

"Resources come from earth or from the sun. Resources are finite, which means even the stuff you throw away is a valuable natural resource. Reusing it makes sense," Trash said.