Active shooter training discussed at meeting

By RICK WATSON
Posted 6/13/18

Jaris Crump, reserve police officer in Dora, was the guest speaker at the East Walker Chamber of Commerce monthly meeting on Tuesday, speaking about what to do in case an active shooter comes …

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Active shooter training discussed at meeting

Posted

Jaris Crump, reserve police officer in Dora, was the guest speaker at the East Walker Chamber of Commerce monthly meeting on Tuesday, speaking about what to do in case an active shooter comes into a school, church or place of business.

Crump put himself through ALICE active shooter training. His goal is to share information with local leaders and business people on how to respond in the event of an active shooter.

The safety training provided to groups changed in 1999 after two students walked into Columbine High School in Colorado and murdered 12 students and one teacher, Crump said. The training up to that point was to try and barricade doors and then hide under desks or in closets.

"People become targets when they hide in contained spaces," Crump said.

One training approach that evolved out of that tragedy and others has been ALICE (Alert Lockdown Inform Counter Evacuate) training.

Crump said utilizing those techniques gives people a chance to survive in the face of an active shooter instead of being a target.

“It comes down to what you know and what you’re going to do in case of an active shooter,” Crump said. In the past, the only response to an active shooter was lockdown. In the case of Columbine, this could have increased the numbers of fatalities, according to Crump.

“Being prepared beforehand adds to your chance of survival," Crump said. "Preparing beforehand means knowing key numbers for your facility, and numbers for the local police so they can be alerted in the event of trouble." This is the first step in ALICE training.

Lockdown is a technique that works in some situations, Crump added. Fire doors and other security measures can sometimes hold a shooter at bay.

Inform is the the third step in the training. Crump said that is basically informing the people around you of what you know and what is going on.

Counter is the next step in the acronym.

"Counter simply means if you’re backed into a corner and a shooter is coming at you, the best thing to do is resist. Use whatever you can get your hands on. It’s you or them,” Crump said.

Evacuate is the last thing on the ALICE list.

“Know ahead of time how you’re going to get out if a disgruntled family member comes in with intent to harm. Know where the exits are and how you would escape if you needed to,” he said.

Crump said people should know how to evacuate your school, church, business or office in case of emergency.

"Planning ahead of time what you would do in the event of an active shooter is essential. It’s not something people have had to think about in the past, but recent tragedies make it a fact of life. Being mindful of what one would do in the event of an active shooter is the smart thing to do," he said.

In other business, East Walker Chamber Executive Director Chee-Vee Whitfield reminded members of the upcoming meet-and-greet meeting at the Horse Creek Golf Clubhouse on June 19, from 11:30 a.m. untill 1 p.m.

The second annual Chamber Golf Tournament is August 17. Details are available on www.eastwalkerchamberofcommerce.com.

The chamber is also holding a grand opening ribbon-cutting for Home Town Sign Shop. Details for that event is on the chamber’s Facebook page.