Today's top headlines and weather
Sep 03, 2013 | 1315 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Today’s headlines

•Jasper man dies in hit-and-run accident

•RPS gains new tool in effort to save more lives

•Ala. GOP leader worries about invaders from Democratic Party

•Obama trying to persuade lawmakers on Syria

Today’s weather

A mix of sun and clouds. A high near 88; a low near 61

AP Top stories

1) Assad: Risk of regional war if West strikes Syria

PARIS (AP) - France released an intelligence report on Monday alleging chemical weapons use by Syria's regime that dovetailed with similar U.S. claims, as President Bashar Assad warned that any military strike against his country would spark an uncontrollable regional war and spread "chaos and extremism." The verbal crossfire, including a rejection of the Western allegations by longtime Syrian ally Russia, was part of frenzied efforts on both sides to court international public opinion after President Barack Obama said he would seek authorization from Congress before launching any military action against Assad's regime.

2) In first major test, Obama overules new team

WASHINGTON (AP) - For President Barack Obama's new foreign policy advisers, the first test of their willingness to undertake military action wound up being a stark lesson in the president's ability to overrule them all. Obama's abrupt decision to seek congressional approval before striking Syria also overshadowed what had been a surprising level of consensus among the second-term team members about how to respond to a deadly chemical weapons attack against civilians in Syria.

3) Some flu vaccines promise a little more protection

WASHINGTON (AP) - Flu vaccination is no longer merely a choice between a jab in the arm or a squirt in the nose. This fall, some brands promise a little extra protection. For the first time, certain vaccines will guard against four strains of flu rather than the usual three. Called quadrivalent vaccines, these brands may prove more popular for children than their parents. That's because kids tend to catch the newly added strain more often.

4) Nyad first to swim from Florida to Cuba without cage

KEY WEST, Fla. (AP) - Looking dazed and sunburned, U.S. endurance swimmer Diana Nyad walked ashore Monday, becoming the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without the help of a shark cage. The 64-year-old Nyad swam up to the beach just before 2 p.m. EDT, about 53 hours after starting her journey from Havana on Saturday. As she approached, spectators waded into waist-high water and surrounded her, taking pictures and cheering her on.

5) Sandy’s freaky path may be less likely in future

WASHINGTON (AP) - Man-made global warming may further lessen the likelihood of the freak atmospheric steering currents that last year shoved Superstorm Sandy due west into New Jersey, a new study says. But don't celebrate a rare beneficial climate change prediction just yet. The study's authors said the once-in-700-years path was only one factor in the massive $50 billion killer storm. They said other variables such as sea level rise and stronger storms will worsen with global warming and outweigh changes in steering currents predicted by the study's computer models.

6) Iraq promises probe into Iranian exile killings

BAGHDAD (AP) - Iraq's prime minister ordered an investigation Monday into the slaying of half of the roughly 100 remaining residents at an Iranian dissident camp north of Baghdad, where a U.N. team got its first look at the aftermath of the large-scale bloodshed. The promised probe will do little to appease backers of the more than 3,000 exiles left inside Iraq who believe they remain targets in a country whose government wants them gone.

7) CBS on air in NY, LA, Dallas with Time Warner deal

NEW YORK (AP) - TV network CBS and cable provider Time Warner Cable have ended their monthlong dispute and resumed broadcast programming in millions of homes in New York, Dallas and Los Angeles.

8) Lava lamps; 50 years old and still groovy

LONDON (AP) - Call them `60s relics or hippy home accessories, lava lamps have been casting their dim but groovy light on interiors for half a century, having hit British shelves 50 years ago on Tuesday. A British company began marketing their original creation as an "exotic conversation piece" in 1963. Since then, millions of models of the much-copied invention have been sold