Sumiton Housing Authority remodels units
by Rachel Davis
Feb 07, 2013 | 1832 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Sumiton Mayor Petey Ellis, Sumiton Housing Authority Chairman Jon Gant and board member Joe Paul Holley look over one of the newly renovated housing units. The units are undergoing renovations to make them more energy efficient, covert them to all electric appliances and provide general improvements. Daily Mountain Eagle - Rachel Davis
Sumiton Mayor Petey Ellis, Sumiton Housing Authority Chairman Jon Gant and board member Joe Paul Holley look over one of the newly renovated housing units. The units are undergoing renovations to make them more energy efficient, covert them to all electric appliances and provide general improvements. Daily Mountain Eagle - Rachel Davis
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SUMITON — The Sumiton Housing Authority is in the middle of a massive remodel of its 41 units that includes converting all the units to all electric appliances.

The units were originally built in 1969 and currently house between 75 and 100 residents, including families, single residents and elderly.

The community, which is located just off Main Street in Sumiton had fallen into disrepair some years ago and was not well maintained, but over the last 15 to 20 years, Mayor Petey Ellis said that has changed and major improvements and upgrades have been made.

“We are very fortunate to have people here who care,” Ellis said. “There are no major issues and they have great tenants who appreciate having a nice place to live. It becomes family to them.”

To foster that family environment, the housing authority also provides activities and parties to keep the residents involve and engaged in their community.

“We have people here who participate,” board member Joe Paul Holley said.

“It’s worth is all when you know they come from a home that’s not safe or not warm and you see their faces when they see this place,” Executive Director Linda McClellan added.

McClellan said that she has a long waiting list for the units and that if she had more units she could easily rent them because people are so eager to join the community atmosphere.

Ellis said that the city and the housing authority may look into expanding the development into more buildings in the future because it is an asset to the city.

“Whatever we can do as a city government to help, we need to do it,” Ellis said.

The next big project will be new roofs for the units, according to McClellan. Funding for these projects comes from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.