Snow could follow rain in central Ala.
by From Staff Reports
Jan 17, 2013 | 2269 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Heavy rainfall has caused water to rise along the Black Warrior River in Walker County. Areas along the Mulberry Fork of the Black Warrior River that were seeing minor flooding problems on Wednesday included the Barney Beach community just south of Cordova and several fishing camps in the Copeland Ferry community. Daily Mountain Eagle - Elane Jones
Heavy rainfall has caused water to rise along the Black Warrior River in Walker County. Areas along the Mulberry Fork of the Black Warrior River that were seeing minor flooding problems on Wednesday included the Barney Beach community just south of Cordova and several fishing camps in the Copeland Ferry community. Daily Mountain Eagle - Elane Jones
slideshow
Forecasters said the rain that has been soaking north Alabama for days could turn into snow before it ends.

The National Weather Service issued a winter storm watch for much of the area, saying parts of north Alabama could receive 1 inch to 4 inches of snow, with most of the accumulation on grassy areas.

Snow could begin overnight Wednesday and continue possibly into Friday in some places.

The biggest threat was northeast of Birmingham, particularly in higher elevations.

“We’re not forecasting any widespread travel problems, but it’s something to watch,” said Roger McNeil, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in suburban Birmingham.

Due to the winter storm watch, the Walker County Board of Education has decided to delay school openings by two hours until 10 a.m. today.

Superintendent Jason Adkins said it was only a precaution.

“We’re just not sure what it might do, so delaying school by a couple of hours is our best option,” he said. “That will give us some time to see what the roads are like and then re-evaluate the situation.”

Victory Christian Academy in Jasper will also delay opening until 10 a.m.

Some areas have received as much as 6 inches of rain since Sunday. Much of northern and western Alabama were under flood warnings, with high water forcing scattered road closings.

Yasamie August, a spokeswoman with the Alabama Emergency Management Agency, said officials had to block nearly two dozen roads in Lamar, Walker and DeKalb Counties because of high water.

“Lamar County has really had the worst of it,” said McNeil. “As you go further northwest the rainfall totals get heavier.”

Forecasters said the Flint River was more than a foot above flood level in Madison County, and the Paint Rock River was 2 feet above flood level in Jackson County and rising.

Low-lying areas are flooding at both spots, and forecasters said the Tennessee River also was headed upward.

Forecasters said roads could develop icy spots because of standing water left by the heavy rains.