Recount confirms Wright as District 2 county commissioner
by James Phillips
Nov 20, 2012 | 1979 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Walker County Probate Judge Rick Allison and staff from his office look over a ballot during Monday’s recount of the Walker County Commission District 2 race. Photo by: Jennifer Cohron
Walker County Probate Judge Rick Allison and staff from his office look over a ballot during Monday’s recount of the Walker County Commission District 2 race. Photo by: Jennifer Cohron
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Walker County election officials spent several hours Monday recounting ballots from District 2 to confirm that incumbent Dan Wright will remain that district’s commissioner for another four years.

Wright, a Democrat, led Republican Davey Reed by 14 votes on election night — 3,203 to 3,189. That margin dwindled to eight votes — 3,207 to 3,199 — after provisional ballots were counted.

Walker County Probate Judge Rick Allison oversaw Monday’s recount and reported the final vote numbers to be Wright with 3,209 and Reed with 3,199.

Wright said it is good to finally have the election process completed.

“Now we can move forward,” he said. “I have a lot of hope that our commission is going to work together to do what is best for Walker County. I have a lot of confidence in what I can do and what the other people who have been elected can do.”

Despite being the only Democrat on the Walker County Commission, Wright said he expects to work well with the other members of the group.

“It has never been about political parties for me,” Wright said. “I wanted this job again, because I want to work for the people of Walker County. For me it is the people, and not the party, and I think all of us want to do what’s best for the people.”

Reed said he felt his first attempt at political office was a success despite not winning.

“Only 10 votes were the difference, and I think that’s pretty good considering how heavily Democrat District 2 is,” Reed said. “I was a newcomer to politics and running against an incumbent, so I think I did a pretty good job.”

Allison said the recount process went smoothly but was time consuming.

“We just fed the machine, and it took a while,” he said.

Due to the slight margin in the race, Allison said a recount was mandatory.

According to Alabama law, a recount is automatically held if a candidate in a general election is defeated by no more than .5 percent of the total votes cast for the office.

“This is something we had to do,” Allison said. “We kept the cost down by using volunteers from several county departments.”