Monument honors city’s mining history
by James Phillips
Mar 22, 2013 | 1983 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A statue to honor miners from Carbon Hill was put into place Thursday morning on the lawn of city hall. The city is also selling memorial bricks to be placed around the statue. Photo Special to the Eagle - Matt Dozier
A statue to honor miners from Carbon Hill was put into place Thursday morning on the lawn of city hall. The city is also selling memorial bricks to be placed around the statue. Photo Special to the Eagle - Matt Dozier
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CARBON HILL — Coal mining has played a significant role in the history of Carbon Hill. The city’s name is derived from the industry, and Mayor James “Pee Wee” Richardson said the community is indebted to mining and the miners who have worked in the area throughout the years.

“I would hate to see our town if we had not had mining here,” he said. “We owe a lot to the miners that have worked here. Some even gave their lives here.”

A monument, honoring the city’s mining history, was placed in front of Carbon Hill City Hall Thursday morning. Richardson said he is proud of the statue of a miner, which he said stands in honor of all miners from Carbon Hill and its surrounding areas.

“When I took office, this project was already in progress,” Richardson said. “I made a promise that I would see it through, and I’m proud to have it sitting here.”

Council member Chris Pschirer said the project was the idea of a middle school student.

Lexi Spivey was a seventh-grader when she approached the council in 2010 with the idea of a monument to honor area minors.

“This girl was so brave to come up and talk to the council. I don’t know how we couldn’t have done this,” Pschirer said. “I thought it was a great idea from the minute I heard about it, and I’m happy to see it in place today.”

The Carbon Hill Mining Monument cost the city an estimated $12,000.

Richardson said the city is currently selling memorial bricks to be placed around the monument. They are $25 each and can be made in honor or in memory of anyone. The bricks can be purchased at city hall.

“It looks good now, but when we start getting the bricks put around it, it is going to look great,” Richardson said. “I want to urge everyone to come down and purchase bricks in honor of their loved ones, especially for people who have worked in the mines.”