Jailers, dispatchers required to be pepper-sprayed in training class
by Rachel Davis
Jun 29, 2013 | 2962 views | 0 0 comments | 78 78 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Winston County jailer Karyn Howten gets sprayed with chemical spray during a portion of the Jail Management school hosted this week by Bevill State Community College. Daily Mountain Eagle - Rachel Davis
Winston County jailer Karyn Howten gets sprayed with chemical spray during a portion of the Jail Management school hosted this week by Bevill State Community College. Daily Mountain Eagle - Rachel Davis
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Jailers and dispatchers from three local jails attended classes this week to learn how to handle situations that arise in their facilities.

The jail management course, sponsored by Bevill State, consists of two 40-hour weeks of instruction. Five attendees were from Sumiton Police Department, one from Dora Police Department and three from the Winston County Jail.

This week the jailers learned about basic jail security; booking, classifying and releasing inmates; escape awareness and detection; medical problems; fire safety; history of jails; jail emergencies; legal rights and standards/report writing; suicide prevention and response to in-custody death; and supervision of inmates, among other topics.

Each jailer also had the opportunity to receive certification in using chemical spray, handcuffing procedures and first aid/CPR/AED.

“This is part of the ongoing training for local law enforcement, and that includes jailers,” Bevill Police Chief and Walker County Coroner J.C. Poe said. “This will enable us to provide a safe environment for inmates, as well as a safe environment for the jailers.”

Winston County Sheriff Rick Harris said the three people from his office who were attending the class had high praise for the classes.

“My folks have bragged about the quality of the instruction and the camraderie developing between the two counties and the local municipalities,” Harris said. “As a sheriff, I’m excited to see quality, affordable instruction offered to us close to home.”

Harris said that previously these types of programs required sending personnel to other areas, incurring expenses for overnight accommodations as well as creating staffing problems.

The cost per person was $50 and included lunch. There will be a second week of classes for further jail instruction, but a date has not yet been set.